Chronic care management

Our Chronic Care Management programs can help you stay healthy. We do this by teaching you about your condition and helping you learn how to stay well. There's no cost to you. It's part of your health plan benefits.

Our program helps those who have diabetes, asthma, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cornorary artery disease (CAD), depression, Hepatitis C, sickle cell anemia, HIV/AIDS or who are obese. The program will give you many benefits. Here are a couple:

  • You’ll receive a newsletter twice a year with the latest information about your condition.
  • You’ll get other reading materials that can help you understand and manage your medications. These also help you plan visits to your doctor.

    Often, the health information we receive helps us identify members who may need help managing their condition. A care management staff member may call you to see if you’d like to join the program.  You may also call us if you are interested in the Chronic Care Management Program. Just call Aetna Better Health of Louisiana at 1-855-242-0802, TTY 711. Ask to speak to a staff member who helps with disease management. The Chronic Care Management Program is voluntary. You can stop taking part in the program anytime. Just call us to let us know.

Asthma affects people in different ways. In some people it’s worse, and they have a lot of trouble breathing. Others don’t have as many problems. If you have asthma, the important thing is to discuss your case with your doctor. We’re here to help.

If you’re low risk, we’ll give you information to help you take care of yourself.

If you’re high risk, a care manager will call you to talk about your care. Here are some things the case manager will talk about with you:

  • Taking care of your asthma at home
  • Why taking your medicine is important
  • What causes asthma attacks
  • Why you need to do what your doctor tells you
  • Ways to change your habits so you feel better

It’s important to learn as much as you can about your asthma.

If you want to learn more about Aetna Better Health of Louisiana’s asthma management program, call Member Services toll-free at 1-855-242-0802, TTY 711. Ask to talk to an asthma care manager.

Newsletters

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung disease. We can help you get care if you have COPD. Many people live active lives with COPD. We can help you live well too.

COPD happens slowly over time. At first, people may not know there’s a problem. With COPD, people’s lungs don’t work as well as they used to. Some people have worse COPD than others. That’s why everyone’s treatment is different. We’ll work with you and your doctor to find the best treatment for you.

We have a Chronic Care Management Program for our members who have COPD. Tell your doctor and us if you have lung disease. We’ll find out if you are at low risk or high risk for problems with COPD.

If you are at high risk, a care manager (CM) will call you to see if you need more help. The CM will talk to you about your treatment. Some people need oxygen therapy or more medicines. If you are a smoker, the CM will also talk to you about how to stop smoking.

It is important to learn as much as you can about your COPD. To learn more about COPD, just call Member Services toll-free at 1-855-242-0802, TTY 711. Ask to talk to your care manager.

Newsletters

Fall/Winter 2015 COPD newsletter English/Spanish

 

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the U.S. in both men and women.

CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened and narrowed. This is due to the buildup of cholesterol and other material, called plaque, on their inner walls. As the buildup grows, less blood can flow through the arteries. The heart muscle can't get the blood or oxygen it needs. This can lead to chest pain or a heart attack. Most heart attacks happen when a blood clot suddenly cuts off the hearts' blood supply, causing permanent heart damage.

Over time, CAD can also weaken the heart muscle and contribute to heart failure. Heart failure means the heart can't pump blood well to the rest of the body.

It’s important to learn as much as you can about CAD. If you want to learn more about Aetna Better Health of Louisiana's Chronic Care Management Program for CAD, call Member Services toll free at 1-855-242-0802, TTY 711. Ask to talk to a CAD Care Manager.

Newsletters

Fall/Winter 2015 CAD newsletter English/Spanish

Sadness is a normal reaction to things that happen to us in life. Something may happen that causes sadness. But often, there is no clear reason for the sadness. If that sadness continues and begins to create other symptoms, it becomes depression. Depression has numerous signs that include some of the following:

  • A feeling that nothing will ever get better
  • Lost interest in things that used to be enjoyable
  • Weight loss or gain of 5 percent of body weight
  • Sleep changes (sleeping more or less than usual)
  • Increased anger or grumpiness
  • Increased feeling of tiredness
  • Low self-worth
  • Reckless behavior
  • Trouble making decisions or remembering
  • An increase in aches and pains for which your doctor cannot find a reason

Everyone feels sad or blue from time to time, but depression is more serious. Depression is an illness. It can make you feel helpless and sad. It can prevent you from thinking clearly and acting appropriately.

If you have depression, we can help you get the care you need. Symptoms of depression and treatment are different for each person. We want you to live well, and seeing your provider regularly for symptoms of depression is very important.

If your depression is mild, you will receive information to help you manage your depression. If your depression is more serious, a care manager will call you to see how they can help you.  Your care manager will teach you about depression and help you take good care of yourself.

It’s important to learn as much as you can about your depression. If you want to learn more about Aetna Better Health of Louisiana's Chronic Care Management Program for depression, call Member Services toll free at 1-855-242-0802, TTY 711. Ask to talk to a Depression Care Manager.

Newsletters

Fall/Winter 2015 Depression newsletter English/Spanish

 

People with diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. If you have diabetes, we can help you manage it better.  Without treatment, you could develop major health problems, like heart disease. Diabetes also can severely affect your eyesight.

Some people have mild diabetes. They take care of it by exercising and eating healthy foods. Other people have diabetes that is more serious. They have to take shots of a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps your body's cells use food the right way. Everyone with diabetes needs care from a doctor.

We have a Chronic Care Management Program for members with diabetes. Tell your doctor and us if you have diabetes. Call us if your doctor tells you that you have diabetes. We’ll work with you to see if you are at low risk or high risk for problems.

If you’re at low risk, we’ll give you information to help you care for yourself. Also, we’ll work with your doctor to get you the right care.

If you’re at high risk, a care manager will call you to see if you need more help. We can teach you about diabetes and help you take care of yourself. You’ll learn:

  • How to take care of your diabetes
  • How to watch your blood sugar
  • Why you need to take your medicine
  • How to take good care of your feet
  • Why you need to do what your doctor tells you
  • How to learn healthy habits so you feel better

It’s important to learn as much as you can about your diabetes.

If you want to learn more about Aetna Better Health of Louisiana’s diabetes management program, call Member Services toll-free at 1-855-242-0802, TTY 711. Ask to talk to a diabetes care manager.

Care4Life program
We are offering a program to help you manage your diabetes. Care4life is a diabetes education and support program.

 

Newsletters

Fall/Winter 2015 Diabetes newsletter English/Spanish

Your heart is a wonderful machine that pumps blood to every cell in your body. Your blood carries oxygen and important nutrients your body needs. When your cells are fed properly, your body can function normally.

If you have heart failure (HF), your heart is weaker. It can't always supply the cells with enough oxygen. That’s why you may often feel tired or short of breath. Everyday activities such as walking, climbing stairs or carrying groceries can become very difficult.

We can help you. We have a Chronic Care Management Program for members with HF. We can help you get care from a doctor. It’s important to get good care. Otherwise, you may get much worse and need to go to the hospital.

Many people live very well with HF. You can too. To live well, however, you must see a doctor regularly and do what the doctor tells you. We’ll work with you and your doctor to get you the right treatment.

Most people with HF fit in one of four groups:

  • Group One: A person may not have signs of HF or heart damage. He or she may have other problems such as high blood pressure, diabetes or blocked blood vessels in the heart. We’ll teach you ways to live healthier if you are part of this group. Then it will be less likely that your HF will quickly get worse.
  • Group Two: A person's heart has been damaged. The heart is not as healthy as it could be. But the person does not show symptoms of heart failure. Maybe the person has had a heart attack or an infection in the heart. Maybe the heart valves are not working correctly. Your doctor may give you medicine called ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers if you’re part of this group.
  • Group Three: A person's heart may be damaged, as in Group Two. The person shows signs of  heart failure. We’ll teach you healthier habits to adopt if you’re part of this group. You’ll learn about exercise and eating healthy food. Also, your doctor may give you more medicines to treat your HF.  Your doctor may send you to a heart specialist.
  • Group Four: This is the most serious group. In this group, the heart is weaker. It may not be able to pump blood to the body very well. Your doctor will work with a heart doctor to treat you. It’s likely you may need to go to the hospital for treatment if you are part of Group Four.

It’s important to learn as much as you can about your HF. If you want to learn more about Aetna Better Health of Louisiana's Chronic Care Management Program for HF, call Member Services toll free at 1-855-242-0802, TTY 711. Ask to talk to a HF Care Manager.

Newsletters

Fall/Winter 2015 Heart Failure newsletter English/Spanish

Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. There are many kinds of hepatitis. Some can be spread. Others cannot. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is spread by blood exposure. HCV can lead to lifelong liver disease in about 80 percent of people infected. Complications include chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, liver failure, and liver cancer.

Symptoms of Hepatitis C (HCV)
Most people notice no problems after being infected with HCV. They could feel tired and not hungry. They could also have nausea, vomiting, stomach pain or joint pain.

Most people with HCV have it for the rest of their lives. But many people never have any major problems. If you have HCV, you can keep it under control.

Avoid things that can make HCV worse. Drinking alcohol makes you much more likely to have health problems related to HCV. So does using certain medications and supplements. By avoiding these, you can greatly increase your chances of staying healthy.

It’s important to learn as much as you can about HCV. If you want to learn more about Aetna Better Health of Louisiana's Chronic Care Management Program for HCV, call Member Services toll- free at 1-855-242-0802, TTY 711. Ask to talk to a care manager for HCV.

Newsletters

Fall/Winter 2015 Hep C newsletter English/Spanish

Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS)
HIV is carried in semen, vaginal fluid, blood, and breast milk.

  • During sex, HIV can enter the body through the fragile tissue that lines the vagina, penis, anus, and mouth.
  • During drug use, tattooing, or body piercing, the virus can enter the bloodstream through a shared needle.
  • A mother who has HIV can infect her child during childbirth and through breastfeeding.

How HIV infection progresses
After HIV enters the body, it attacks the immune system in stages. A person with HIV can infect others once the virus enters the bloodstream.

HIV with no symptoms
A person with HIV may have no symptoms for years. The only sign of infection may be a positive blood test for HIV antibodies six weeks to six months after HIV enters the body.

HIV with symptoms
When the virus becomes active, symptoms begin to develop. These may include swollen lymph glands, fever, night sweats, diarrhea, skin rashes, and sores. Symptoms may be mild at first, and then slowly get worse and last for longer and longer periods.

AIDS
AIDS is the last stage of HIV infection. Diseases and cancers begin to overcome the body. It is these diseases, not the virus itself, which can cause death. HIV may also attack the brain and nervous system, causing seizures, and loss of memory and body movement.

It’s important to learn as much as you can about HIV/AIDS. If you want to learn more about Aetna Better Health of Louisiana's Chronic Care Management Program for HIV/AIDS, call Member Services toll-free at 1-855-242-0802, TTY 711. Ask to talk to a HIV/AIDS care manager.

Newsletters

Fall/Winter 2015 HIV/AIDS newsletter English/Spanish

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height.

Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories in and calories out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active.

Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds.

If you want to learn more about Aetna Better Health of Louisiana's Chronic Care Management Program for obesity, call Member Services toll-free at 1-855-242-0802, TTY 711. Ask to talk to an obesity care manager.

Newsletters

Fall/Winter 2015 Obesity newsletter English/Spanish

People who have sickle cell anemia are born with it. It comes from genes passed down by both parents. It affects the red blood cells (RBCs). RBCs have a protein called hemoglobin that carries oxygen through the body. With sickle cell anemia, a problem with the hemoglobin causes the cells to be C-shaped (like a sickle) instead of round. As a result, the cells can’t move easily through the smallest blood vessels. Because the cells tend to stick together, they can clog the vessels and prevent normal blood flow. Also, sickle cells don’t live as long as normal RBCs. When the body doesn’t have enough healthy RBCs, this causes anemia. Sickle cell anemia is very serious.

With sickle cell anemia, problems can occur all over the body. These include:

  • Pain, ranging from mild to severe, over the whole body
  • Damage to the spleen 
  • Infections 
  • Lung problems 
  • Stroke
  • Other complications - swelling in the hands and feet, leg ulcers, eye damage, delayed growth, gallstones, or painful and prolonged erections

If you want to learn more about Aetna Better Health of Louisiana's Chronic Care Management Program for sickle cell anemia, call Member Services toll-free at 1-855-242-0802, TTY 711. Ask to talk to a care manager for sickle cell anemia.

Newsletters

Fall/Winter 2015 Sickle Cell Anemia newsletter English/Spanish